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Friday, 20 May 2022

Summer Glauc

 

First summer Glaucous Gull, Dingle 20th May 2022 (Michael O'Clery).

First summer Glaucous Gull, Dingle 20th May 2022 (Michael O'Clery).

First summer Glaucous Gull, Dingle 20th May 2022 (Michael O'Clery).

Saturday, 12 February 2022

Winter gulls

 Some winter gulls for your viewing pleasure, from recent days.

Adult Kumlien's Gull, Tralee Bay Wetlands Centre, 11th February 2022 (David O'Connor).

Adult Kumlien's Gull, Tralee Bay Wetlands Centre, 11th February 2022 (David O'Connor).

Adult Kumlien's Gull, Tralee Bay Wetlands Centre, 11th February 2022 (David O'Connor).

First-winter Ring-billed Gull, Tralee Bay Wetlands Centre, 11th February 2022 (Ed Carty).

Adult Ring-billed Gull, Tralee Bay Wetlands Centre, 11th February 2022 (Ed Carty).

Adult Yellow-legged Gull, Black Rock, 4th February 2022 (Hubert Servignat).

Adult Yellow-legged Gull, Black Rock, 4th February 2022 (Hubert Servignat).


Wednesday, 2 February 2022

Gaucous Gull double at Brandon Bay

Two Glaucous Gulls, Kilcummin, Brandon Bay, 2nd February 2022 (David O'Connor).

First-winter Glaucous Gull, Kilcummin, Brandon Bay, 2nd February 2022 (David O'Connor).

Second wwinter Glaucous Gull, Kilcummin, Brandon Bay, 2nd February 2022 (David O'Connor).

 

Sunday, 30 January 2022

10 or more Siberian Chiffchaffs, Killarney

 Today there was at least 10, possibly 15 or more, Siberian Chiffchaffs at Killarney National Park. Most, of course, were at the known wintering Chiffchaff hot spot, the waterworks stream, with up to five in view at the same time, but others, or some of the same ones, on trees and overhanging foliage along the stream below the waterworks, and yet more further S near Ross Castle, and along the River Walk a little to the west. Hard to know how many birds were involved, but ten is the minimum. Also present were at least 15-20 regular Chiffchaffs.

Siberian Chiffchaff, Killarney NP, 30th January 2022 (Michael O'Clery).

Siberian Chiffchaff, Killarney NP, 30th January 2022 (Michael O'Clery).

Siberian Chiffchaff, Killarney NP, 30th January 2022 (Michael O'Clery).

Siberian Chiffchaff, Killarney NP, 30th January 2022 (Michael O'Clery).

Siberian Chiffchaff, Killarney NP, 30th January 2022 (Michael O'Clery).

Siberian Chiffchaff, Killarney NP, 30th January 2022 (Michael O'Clery).

Siberian Chiffchaff, Killarney NP, 30th January 2022 (Michael O'Clery).


Green-winged Teal, Tralee

 

Green-winged Teal, Cockleshell Road, Tralee, 22nd January 2022 (Michael O'Clery).

Green-winged Teal, Cockleshell Road, Tralee, 22nd January 2022 (Michael O'Clery).



Friday, 28 January 2022

Adult Kumlien's Gull at Blennerville

Adult Kumlien's Gull, Cockleshell Road, near Blennerville, Tralee, 27th January 2022 (David O'Connor).

 

Monday, 17 January 2022

American Coot, Ring-necked Ducks and Glossy Ibis

The Cromane area is full of rarity interest these days. An American Coot on Lough Yganavan was sharing the lake with two Ring-necked Ducks, while just a few fields away, a Glossy Ibis continues its stay. And of course, the reliable, long-staying Spoonbill is just up the road at Cromane.

American Coot, Lough Yganavan, 17th January 2022 (Cait O'Neill).

American Coot, Lough Yganavan, 17th January 2022 (Cait O'Neill).

American Coot, Lough Yganavan, 17th January 2022 (Cait O'Neill).

American Coot, Lough Yganavan, 17th January 2022 (Cait O'Neill).

Glossy Ibis, near Cromane, 15th January 2022 (Ed Carty).

Ring-necked Ducks, Lough Yganavan, 17th January 2022 (Cait O'Neill).

Friday, 3 December 2021

Goosander at Black Rock

 

Goosander, Black Rock, 1st December 2021 (David O'Connor).

Goosander, Black Rock, 1st December 2021 (David O'Connor)

Tuesday, 9 November 2021

Common Tern in November? Very uncommon

There were three species of tern in Sandy Bay on Sunday last (7th November), which might well be a Kerry first for the month of November - a Black Tern, 4 Sandwich Terns, and a juvenile Common Tern.

Juvenile Common Tern, Sandy Bay, 7th October 2021 (Michael O'Clery).
Going by the records on the increasingly useful IrishBirding website (HERE) there were only 16 Irish records of Common Tern in November reported to the website in the whole of Ireland, from 2008 (including this one, the only Kerry one shown). There were 7 records of Black Tern during the same period.

Surf Scoters, Lough Gill & Smerwick Harbour

Female/juvenile Surf Scoter, Lough Gill,  29th October 2021 (Hubert Servignat).

Female/juvenile Surf Scoter, Smerwick Harbour, 8th November 2021 (Michael O'Clery).

Female/juvenile Surf Scoter, Smerwick Harbour, 8th November 2021 (Michael O'Clery).
Common Scoter numbers have diminished hugely on the Dingle Peninsula in recent years. The Brandon Bay flock, which a decade ago, regularly numbered around 1500+ has fallen away to just a peak of perhaps 200 last winter. Currently, and I checked, there are 12 Common Scoter there when you might expect a four figure number. Similarly, the Inch and Rossbeigh numbers have fallen precipitously in recent years, with peaks of only 60 -100 birds in the last two winters when previously there might have been anything from  few hundred to a few thousand. I checked yesterday at Inch, and there were 6.

And of course, the much rarer Surf Scoter often associates with the Common Scoter flocks here, but it is perhaps telling that these two recent Surf Scoter individuals (yes, the Lough Gill bird and the Smerwick Harbour birds were both seen at their respective sites today, so not the same bird), were on their own, and not associating with their near-relatives, Common Scoter. It seems that Common Scoter ain't so common around here anymore.